Refashion Runway Project 2: 1970s

I took inspiration from my 1976 first-grade class picture to create a modern look with a 1970s twist, using all refashioned and upcycled materials. To check out other refashions, and to vote for your faves, visit The Renegade Seamstress Refashion Runway Season 5.

70s refashion before (3)

The 1970s were not a pretty decade style-wise – in fact, a true 1970s look should feel a bit sleazy and unappealing. So I tried to make something true to the era yet wearable for today.

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70s style complete with boots, cheap jewelry and hoop earrings

I worked with these raw materials: old jeans from my husband, a vintage men’s shirt and old kitchen curtains with crochet edging.

70s refashion before (2)

Let’s start with the top! The colors exactly match the dress in my class picture, so I had to go for it. Also, paisleys were such a huge motif  from that era in fashion. If you find any ugly wide neckties from the mid-1970s, I bet you $1 in 1970s money (about $6.60 in today’s money) that paisleys swirl around someplace on it.

This shirt is very well made, with flat-felled seams, darts and nice wide facings at the center front. But… it’s made of that notorious spun polyester fabric that disintegrates into fluff instead of unravels at the raw edges.

To make this man’s shirt more feminine, I started by cutting off the button and buttonhole plackets and unpicking the collar, then cutting down the center front on an angle using New Look 6498’s bodice pattern piece.

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Bodice restyle

I harvested the crochet edge from these old kitchen curtains and sewed them to the raw center fronts, then sewed up the middle to join the design into something new. The lacy detail is a bit see-through – just enough for an adult look without being too much. The crochet makes a little collar at the back neckline – cute!

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The sleeves needed help too. Puffy sleeves were in during the mid 1970s, so I cut off the cuff and sleeve plackets, folded over a generous edge, and made an elastic casing with about an inch for a hem. The elastic allows the sleeves to fit more closely with the volume I wanted for a 1970s look.

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Elastic casing with a hem for the sleeve

Finished design:

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The skirt is a throwback to my youth as well. Skirts made from old jeans were all the rage back then. If you don’t believe me, visit any vintage store or trawl eBay and you’ll see tons of these skirts.

To be authentic, I needed to start with men’s jeans. That was the style back in the day – you’d make a skirt from your boyfriend’s old jeans. In this case, my husband supplied these jeans that had seen better days.

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Hubby’s old jeans with legs trimmed to prepare for transformation to a skirt

Making a skirt is pretty easy. Start by cutting off the legs at the length you want. Cut an inch or two longer than the intended finished length to allow for a hem, but leave enough length in the legs to use the leg fabric as center front and back pieces.

Next, cut off both inseams to the crotch line, then unpick a couple of inches front and back – be sure to leave the fly area in the front intact.

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Inseams unpicked and ready for transformation

Next, prepare the leg pieces you trimmed off. Cut them apart at the inseam so they are one nice flat piece and position one in the front and one in the back of the skirt – there will be a lot of fabric overlapping – don’t worry you will trim that off later. The unpicked bit of the front and back crotch should fold flat on top and overlap a bit  (if they are still curling a bit, unpick a bit more until they’re flat).

Pin at the crotch points and all along the wedges.

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Don’t worry if the hem is a bit uneven – you’ll fix that later.

Now sew down the wedge pieces. I just sewed the wedge underlapping the sides because I like the raw edge look. Also, I was going to embroider it and didn’t want any bulk. After the wedges were in place, I trimmed the excess fabric from the wrong side. If you want to get all fancy, you could trim the wedges down first and sew them to the side pieces with a flat-felled seam.

Then try on the skirt and decide on a hem length. It’s best if you can get a friend to help you mark the length so it’s even all around. Turn and topstitch your hem, and you have a skirt!

To make this skirt go with the top and to add more design elements, I decided to embroider the wedge in a 1970s style motif using colors from the top. I started by running a line of embroidery alongside the seam where the wedges meet the front and back.

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Embroidery 70s style

Then I added lines above and below that line – eight lines of embroidery in all. Make sure you have enough thread to spare before you tackle this!

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Looks cute on too and coordinates with the top, a belt with a big ol’ silver buckle and boots:

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70s 2

 

It’s been fun! What’s your favorite decade for fashion?

Author: shoes15

I live in Connecticut, USA with my husband and my dog, in an old house outfitted with a sewing room, a garden, an orchard, and a big liquor cabinet.

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